I mentioned the BBC show “Blackadder” in one of my previous posts, but it deserves a review of its own.  The first season of “The Black Adder” or “Blackadder” was released in 1983, while the second season didn’t air until 1986.  It seems the writers took that time to solidify the characters, since the show takes on a new depth in the second season.

I managed to get my hands on a complete set of “Blackadder” (four seasons).  I wasn’t that impressed with season one, but I kept watching.  Rather glad I did, wot?

Like I said, in the second season, “Blackadder II,” the characters are solidified, and people like Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry become regular cast members.  In fact, Fry plays Lord Melchett, advisor to Queen Elizabeth–played as wonderfully insane by Miranda Richardson.

Rowan Atkinson is, of course, Edmund Blackadder, no matter what the era or season.  Blackadder always has his faithful idiot companion, Baldrick, played by Tony Robinson, no matter his own station in life.

The third season may be one of my favorites, if only because of Hugh Laurie as the incredibly stupid Prince Regent George.  I recommend that anyone who likes the show “House, MD” should watch “Blackadder III” so they can see Laurie’s talent as an actor.  Those used to his arrogant swagger as House may be surprised at his ability to play someone who is too stupid and pampered to dress himself properly.

For those who have ever seen any of Atkinson’s “Mr. Bean” movies or shows, they may be surprised by “Blackadder.”  “Mr. Bean” is mostly slapstick comedy, full of pratfalls, facial contortions, and stupidity.  Edmund Blackadder, on the other hand, is clever, sarcastic, witty, and ambitious.  It is Blackadder’s ambition, both to gain power and money, that often gets him in trouble.

“Blackadder” is full of British humor, which means there are many references to boys’ schools, as well as the typical bathroom humor.  However, there is a certain wittiness in the presentation and in the subject matter that makes it appealing.  And since each season takes place in a different era, one can learn a little bit about history, or at least how the English might view parts of history.

I’ve jolly well had loads of fun watching it!